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CIO  July 2001

CIO July 2001

Subject:

The CIO/CTO issue again

From:

Donald Spicer <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 11 Jul 2001 12:41:48 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (186 lines)

Thought that this may add a perspective on a recent CIO-list discussion
Don Spicer


-----Original Message-----
From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2001 12:35 PM
Subject: CHAD DICKERSON: "CTO Connection" from InfoWorld.com, Wednesday,
July 11, 2001


>========================================================
>CHAD DICKERSON:     "CTO Connection"       InfoWorld.com
>========================================================

>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>FAQ ON CIOS AND CTOS
>
>Posted at July 6, 2001 01:01 PM PST Pacific
>
>
>SINCE I BEGAN writing this column four weeks ago, most
>of the e-mail I get asks the same question: What is
>the difference between a CIO and CTO? People I meet in
>person ask me this question frequently, too. I offer
>the following instructive parable.
>
>Let's pretend that you are working late at the office
>on a high-pressure deadline. You are ready to send a
>critical e-mail to wrap things up for the evening, and
>five seconds before you are about to press Send, the
>office LAN goes down.
>
>The only people left at the office are the CIO and the
>CTO. If you call the CIO and explain the situation, he
>or she will probably tell you that help desk hours are
>between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. and ask you to file a
>trouble ticket. If you call the CTO, there's a good
>chance he or she will go into the wire closet, check a
>few things in the patch panel, and get you running again.
>
>Now, this is obviously a gross oversimplification --
>many CIOs are quite capable technologists who can roll
>up their sleeves and fix an ailing network, thank you
>very much. In some companies, the CIO/CTO is a
>combined position and the distinction is murky at
>best. But for the most part, CIOs are developing into
>very different positions with separate focuses and
>responsibilities. Since joining InfoWorld, I have been
>studying the evolution of these two increasingly
>distinct jobs and have noticed three distinguishing
>characteristics of the CTO position versus that of the
>CIO.
>
>External vs. internal focus
>
>Whereas the CIO is often focused on bottom-line
>internal IT efficiencies, the CTO acts in a more
>strategic role, leveraging technology to push top-line
>revenue, working on new products, investigating and
>recommending emerging technologies, and interacting
>closely with business partners. For the CTO, IT is not
>a cost center but a key part of the revenue-producing
>machine of the company. In large companies, the CIO is
>increasingly likely to function in more of a COO/CFO
>sphere, watching expenses and looking for cost savings.
>
>Passion for technology, but in a biz way
>
>Most CTOs have a passion for technology detail within
>the larger context of driving the strategic goals of
>their businesses. Many CTOs, myself included, joyfully
>run home networks that rival the Pentagon's in
>complexity and security. This passion is illustrated
>by the educational focus of CTOs versus CIOs: 72
>percent of CTOs have an undergraduate degree in
>technology, whereas only 38 percent of CIOs have a
>technology degree. More importantly, the true value of
>a CTO is demonstrated in the combination of business
>acumen with technology capabilities: 36 percent of
>CTOs have MBAs, according to a recent InfoWorld study.
>
>Compensation
>As Randy Newman sang, "It's money that matters," and it
>appears that chief technology officers are doing quite
>well in that department. InfoWorld recently released
>its 2001 Compensation Survey, and my CTO brothers and
>sisters were surely pleased to discover that the
>average CTO salary is $183,535 compared to the average
>CIO salary of $118,278. To paraphrase a line from the
>movie Ferris Bueller's Day Off, referring to a CTO
>this time instead of a Ferrari: "If you have the
>means, I highly recommend picking one up."
>
>Of course, distinctions between CTOs and CIOs vary
>based on company size, industry, and a host of other
>factors -- your mileage may vary. Drop me an e-mail
>and let me know how these titles stack up in your
>companies and how your perceptions compare and
>contrast to mine.
>
>Chad Dickerson is InfoWorld's CTO. Contact him
>at [log in to unmask]
>
>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>MORE CTO CONNECTION
>For a complete archive of his InfoWorld columns visit
>http://www2.infoworld.com/cgi/component/columnarchive.wbs?column=ctoconnect
ion
>
>
>
>INFOWORLD OPINIONS
>Weekly commentary from the most trusted voices in
>IT at: http://www.infoworld.com/community/t_opinions.html
>
>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>QUOTE OF THE DAY:
>
>"Natural selection in business is a wonderful thing. Your
>smarter competitors can move to Linux on the desktop and
>spend their money expanding their own business instead of
>Microsoft's."
>
>--The Open Source columnist Nicholas Petreley argues that
>companies that stick with Microsoft on the desktop will
>eventually find themselves at a competitive disadvantage.
>
>http://iwsun4.infoworld.com/articles/op/xml/01/07/09/010709oppetreley.xml?0
711wectoconn
>
>
>
>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>SUBSCRIBE
>To subscribe to any of InfoWorld's e-mail newsletters,
>tell your friends and colleagues to go to:
>http://www.iwsubscribe.com/newsletters/
>
>To subscribe to InfoWorld.com, or InfoWorld Print,
>or both, go to http://www.iwsubscribe.com
>
>UNSUBSCRIBE
>If you want to unsubscribe from InfoWorld's Newsletters,
>go to http://iwsubscribe.com/newsletters/unsubscribe/
>
>CHANGE E-MAIL
>If you want to change the e-mail address where
>you are receiving InfoWorld newsletters, go to
>http://iwsubscribe.com/newsletters/adchange/
>
>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>For optimal enterprise performance look no further.
>Barbara Gomolski shares all the tricks of the trade
>in her new email column:  E-Business Pulse.
>She'll show you how E-business impacts IT and how
>you can take advantage of the E in E-business to
>move your enterprise to the next level. In your mailbox
>every Tuesday. To subscribe, go to
>http://www.iwsubscribe.com/newsletters
>
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>
>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>Copyright 2001 InfoWorld Media Group Inc.
>
>This message was sent to:  [log in to unmask]
>

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