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NETMAN  2014

NETMAN 2014

Subject:

Re: Fire Alarms on the Network

From:

Barron Hulver <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Thu, 29 May 2014 09:28:06 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (53 lines)

I have considerable experience with this so here are my thoughts that I 
will put in writing.  I can talk privately if you would like more 
information.

In short, I suggest having all alerting sent over a dedicated set of 
fiber strands and all servicing go over the network.  In our case I 
designed a fiber loop around the campus for redundancy - a single fiber 
cut cannot take down our fire alarm system.  Each fire panel will likely 
need a cat-6 network connection for service (such as performing a 
software upgrade).  Recently I made a special network configuration so 
our fire alarm contractor can use a laptop via wireless to connect to 
the fire alarm server.


Barron

Barron Hulver
Director of Networking, Operations, and Systems
Center for Information Technology
Oberlin College
148 West College Street
Oberlin, OH  44074
440-775-8798
[log in to unmask]
http://www2.oberlin.edu/staff/bhulver/





On 5/29/14, 8:48 AM, Peter P Morrissey wrote:
> I was wondering if anyone has or is considering putting fire alarms or
> other life-safety devices on their network. Currently we have fire
> alarms at all our buildings that alert Campus Safety when there is a
> fire in a building. These run on copper wire. I am concerned about the
> implications of running them on our network. Although it tends to be
> reliable, there are more points of failure than a single wire. There are
> also occasional planned outages for upgrades etc that would disrupt the
> ability for the fire alarms to reach their destination. And
> unfortunately, our Cisco edge switches die more frequently than we would
> like. The one advantage of the Keltron system we are looking at is that
> it does buffer alarms, so if there was a short outage, it would transmit
> the saved alarms when the network came back up.
>
> Pete Morrissey
>
> ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE
> Constituent Group discussion list can be found at
> http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
>

**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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