We also had very long login times and received a lot of complaints. A few
years ago we implemented AppSense, which optimizes profile management. It is
not without its own problems but it has reduced login times considerably.

 

Ed Zucker

Colorado School of Mines

 

From: The EDUCAUSE IT Support Services Constituent Group Listserv
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michaud, Jay M
Sent: Monday, November 21, 2016 8:07 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ITSUPPORTSERVICES] computer lab login times (windows OS)

 

I support a similar environment except that we fortunately have SSDs.

 

The #1 first-sign-in time-saver in Windows 8 and higher is unprovisioning
the built-in Windows Store apps (Weather, Calendar, Xbox, Movies & TV,
etc.). These apps are provisioned for each user during user profile creation
and take quite a bit of time (maybe 30 seconds or more on spinning disks). I
use Michael Niehaus
<https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mniehaus/2015/11/11/removing-windows-10
-in-box-apps-during-a-task-sequence/> 's RemoveApps PowerShell script during
deployment of lab computers to remove these apps. (I leave these apps for
non-lab computers that are assigned to specific users, though.) The script
uses the Get-AppxProvisionedPackage
<https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn376467.aspx>  and
Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage
<https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn376476.aspx>  PowerShell
cmdlets, which are documented on TechNet. Be warned: Microsoft continues to
move apps to the Windows Runtime (Windows Store model), so you may not want
to remove all of these apps. For example, in Windows 10 v1607, the trusty
calc.exe went away in favor of a modern app, and if you remove the Photos
app, there is no longer a photo viewer on the computer. It is also my
understanding that in the spring Creators Update release, the venerable
mspaint.exe will be gone in favor of a new modern app. Bottom line: Just be
aware of what you are removing. You can configure the RemoveApps tool (to
which I linked above) to remove only certain apps.

 

I also suggest finding out which processes are running automatically at user
sign-in. Run Autoruns from Sysinternals
<https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902>  to get some
insight on this. Look at the Logon tab, and watch out specifically for
registry keys with "Active Setup" in the path. Active Setup is an operating
system facility used in configuring the user profile, but some vendors think
their application is so important that they insert themselves into this
undocumented location in order to run something at first sign-in. I've seen
Adobe Acrobat Reader and Google Chrome do this. (I once timed Chrome adding
two seconds to every first sign-in this way.) Basically, whenever you see a
non-Windows component under an Active Setup key, it is a good candidate for
deletion (or at least to be disabled with Autoruns until you are sure doing
so doesn't break anything).

 

Good luck!

 

Jay Michaud

System Administrator/Programmer

College of Business Administration

Central Michigan University

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE IT Support Services Constituent Group Listserv
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of John Hilbing
Sent: Sunday, November 20, 2016 8:19 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
Subject: Re: [ITSUPPORTSERVICES] computer lab login times (windows OS)

 

We use a purchased tool http://www.forensit.com/desktop-management.html.

 

Minimizing the number of group policies being applied, local and domain. 

 

We have a minimum standard of 3 minutes from power on to application loaded
with a spinning desk. With SSD we are well under that.

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE IT Support Services Constituent Group Listserv
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lucas Lanting
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 6:26 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
Subject: [ITSUPPORTSERVICES] computer lab login times (windows OS)

 

All,

 

Would you be willing to share your thoughts, tips, tricks, recommendations
and/or best practices in minimizing student computer lab login times? 

 

Our classroom and open lab computers are running Windows 7 or 10 with
DeepFreeze.  We are not currently using roaming profiles or SSDs.  We
require students to log into the computers with their domain account - which
of course requires time for the local profile build.  We have been testing a
number of configurations to reduce our times - but would like to hear from
other universities as to what methodologies have worked well for them. 

 

Thank you for the consideration.

 

Lucas Lanting

Academic Technology Support, Director

IT | Cal Poly Pomona University 

 

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********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE
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